The incidence rate of invasive breast cancer in the united states of america: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from the centers for disease control and prevention 1999-2014

Author: 
Ibrahim G. Alghamdi and Ghanem M. Al-Ghamdi

Background: This study provides descriptive epidemiological data of invasive breast cancer cases diagnosed from 1999 to 2014 in the United States of America.
Methods: This is a retrospective descriptive epidemiological analysis of invasive breast cancer cases recorded in the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention from 1999 to 2014.
Results: The State of Seattle and Detroit had the highest overall age-adjusted incidence rate (142.5 and 132.0 per 100,000 persons) of invasive breast cancer among women across all races (white, black, and Hispanic). The state of Connecticut had the highest overall age-adjusted incidence rate (139.5 per 100,000 persons) of invasive breast cancer among white and Hispanic women, compared to other states located in the northeast. The state of District of Columbia had the highest overall age-adjusted incidence rate (143.9 per 100,000 persons) of invasive breast cancer among white and black women. The state of Hawaii had the highest overall age-adjusted incidence rate (147.4 per 100,000 persons) of invasive breast cancer among Hispanic women compared to other states of America.
Conclusion: This study revealed that the best geographic areas in the United States of America for studying the most important risk factors of invasive breast cancer among women across all races are the state of Seattle, Detroit, Connecticut, Hawaii, and the District of Columbia. Multiple case control studies should be conducted separately in these states across all races to determine the similarities and differences of risk factors that every woman shares.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.24327/ijcar.2017.4399.0505